Saturday, October 19, 2013

Seven Day Fiance Challenge Week 1: Bad Boys of Fiction

Hey, everyone. Rachel Harris' new book, Seven Day Fiancé  is finally out! And in celebration of her new release, the Flirt Squad is taking part in a three week Seven Day Fiancé challenge! Get ready for some awesome fun and humorous posts. 

And what is this week's challenge? The bad boys of fiction. 

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That's right, ladies. We're talking about the bad boys of fiction. And let's be honest, we've all fallen for that stereotypical fictional bad boy at least once in our reading life. But what makes them so damn appealing? What's the attraction? Is it their personality, their looks, their dark and dreary pasts? Is it our need to own their unattainable and guarded hearts? What is about these bad boys that makes us forget all about reason and logic?


Bad boys, bad boys, whatcha gonna do? Whatcha gonna do when they come for you?

Personally, I've never seen the appeal in real-life bad boys. Guys who are arrogant, cocky, and have that 'I-don't-care-about-anything' attitude. But as I'm reading more and more books (especially YA and NA novels), I'm finding that I'm falling harder for the bad boys. Whenever there's a love triangle, I'm always on Team Bad Boy. But... why?

In my opinion, there are three things that make the perfect recipe to create a bad boy. 

1. He's dangerous.
I'm not talking the crazy, stalker type of danger. Nor the danger that involves violence. I think it has more to do with the danger of heartbreak, of wanting something you can't have, of opening your heart to someone who could just as easily crush it as cherish it. It's dangerous to let someone in when they have the power to do irreversible damage.

2. He's sarcastic.
Oh yes, your bad boy has to have that sarcastic sense of humor. He has to be able to throw out those perfect one-liners for any given situation. And even if it's mean, it still makes us giggle hysterically. 

Examples:

 Archers of Avalon:
“How did you kill the Ashman in the forest last year?”“I shot him with an arrow.”“What kind of arrow?”“A sharp one.”Nate rolled his eyes. “Really, dude? A sharp one?” 

“Calm down, Braveheart." Gabriel searched through the weapons. "I'm trying to find something not quite as fatal as...a scythe? Really?"Gabriel held the wicked half-moon blade up and looked at Tristan. "What are you, the Grim Reaper?""Yes. Yes, Gabriel. I'm the Grim Reaper. You caught me. I drive around in my car full of weapons collecting souls.” 
The Infernal Devices: 
Will looked horrified. "What kind of monster could possibly hate chocolate?”

“Remember when you tried to convince me to feed a poultry pie to the mallards in the park to see if you could breed a race of cannibal ducks?" "They ate it too," Will reminisced. "Bloodthirsty little beasts. Never trust a duck.”

Will Herondale and Tristan Archer are two of my favorite fictional bad boys (although I was always Team Jem... :)

3. He's guarded and wary of letting anyone get too close because of his past.

All of these bad boys have something in their pasts that made them this way. And the women always want to find out what it is and heal them. I think that's part of the appeal right there--that need to heal what's broken, that need to repair the damage. But with their guard up, those boys tend to be cocky and have asshole tendencies. But most of us can overlook those tendencies if we think there's something underneath that's worth saving, that's worth breaking down their walls. 

However, these bad boys HAVE TO BE WORTH IT!

Underneath that 'don't-care' attitude and hard exterior, there has to be something that makes them innately good (and not just nice). He has to have a winning personality. He may even have some sexy tattoos. ;) But most importantly, he has to have a good heart

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However, if there's nothing good about him, I won't like him. Even if he has all three of those qualities. 
Examples of literary bad boys I hate:

Jace Herondale. And before you bring out the stones, let me explain. I think Jace has the most disgusting personality. His 'humor' is always bordering that line between sarcasm and cruelty. But most of all, he DOESN'T HAVE A GOOD REASON FOR IT! And he doesn't. Jace doesn't have anything innately good about him, except the fact that he'll do anything for Clary and maybe even the Lightwoods. However, when it comes to other people, he just doesn't care. He doesn't care about anyone but himself. He's selfish. 

Gage Grendel. Gage is from the FireNine series by Shanora Williams. The author tried to portray him as a bad boy with a good heart, but instead he just came off as the biggest douchebag. He drinks, he sleeps around, and he's cocky. Anything he does is a major TURN-OFF. And when you find out his past, it just makes you laugh out loud with the ridiculousness of it. He has no excuse for his actions.

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Even with some of those black sheep, there have been many amazing bad boys in books that I've fallen for. Examples of literary bad boys I love:

Prince Ash (The Iron Fey).
DEAN HOLDER (Hopeless). 
Gabriel Merrick (Elemental). 
Noah Hutchins (Pushing the Limits).
and of course, Cane Robicheaux (Love and Games).

But Tristan Archer will always be my number one bad boy book boyfriend. <3

Look at that tat! ;)

Oh wait. You're not looking at that tattoo, are you? I'll be you're staring at his face.


I don't blame you. It's a nice face.

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Tristan Archer was the first literary bad boy I fell for, and he definitely won't be the last. I'm not ashamed to admit I gravitate toward those bad boys more. Except for Jem Carstairs, they've always won my heart first. But they need to have more appealing qualities besides their looks. And they have to have a good, kind heart. :)